LIGHTHOUSE YARD DECORATIONS. LIGHTHOUSE YARD


Lighthouse yard decorations. French country decore. Easter decorations outdoors.



Lighthouse Yard Decorations





lighthouse yard decorations






    decorations
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • A thing that serves as an ornament

  • The process or art of decorating or adorning something

  • Ornamentation

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"





    lighthouse
  • Light House is a studio album by Kim Carnes, released in 1986 (see 1986 in music).

  • beacon: a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing ships

  • A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses or, in older times, from a fire, and used as an aid to navigation for pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

  • A tower or other structure containing a beacon light to warn or guide ships at sea





    yard
  • A piece of ground adjoining a building or house

  • An area of ground surrounded by walls or buildings

  • a tract of land enclosed for particular activities (sometimes paved and usually associated with buildings); "they opened a repair yard on the edge of town"

  • An area of land used for a particular purpose or business

  • a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride

  • the enclosed land around a house or other building; "it was a small house with almost no yard"











The Crimson Beech




The Crimson Beech





LaTourette Park, Lighthouse Hill, Staten Island, New York City, New York, United States


"The Crimson Beech" (Cass House) on Staten Island is the only residence, and one of only two complete buildings, in New York City designed by American master architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An example of the "Prefab No. 1" prefabricated house designed by Wright in 1956 for builder Marshall Erdman & Associates of Madison, Wisconsin, "The Crimson Beech" was built in 1958-59 under the supervision of Wright's associate Morton H. Del son.

The Erdman prefabs were Wright's last major attempt in his long career to address the problem of well-designed moderate-cost houses, and despite the lesser cost he achieved a design quality consistent with his previous residential work. The components of the house were shipped by truck from Madison and assembled on a steep site on Lighthouse Hill overlooking Richmondtown.

A low, L-shaped, horizontally-articulated residence employing an architectural vocabulary characteristic of Wright's Usonian houses, it is faced in cream-colored painted Masonite with redwood battens and smooth-faced red brick, and has a carport, a reddish-painted terne metal gabled roof, and clerestory windows on the front and large expanses of glass on the rear.

The residence was commissioned by William and Catherine Cass after seeing Wright in a television interview, and the house has been very well maintained by the original client. "The Crimson Beech" took its name from a large several-hundred-year-old copper beech tree formerly growing in the front yard.

Frank Lloyd Wright and Moderate-cost Houses

Although American master architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) is perhaps best known for his residential commissions for the well-to-do and for his wide range of monumental designs, he also had an interest throughout his extraordinarily long career in the problem of producing well-designed moderate-cost housing. As stated by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives, Wright strongly believed that the average American was entitled to a home that could also be a work of art..~

He knew that if the maxim was to apply to the 1 ewer-income home, it would require either prefabrication or a systems-built method of construction. It meant, he explained, that the home would have to go to the factory, rather than skilled labor coming onto the building site.

As early as 1901, Wright produced a series of designs for moderate-cost model suburban houses for the Ladies Home Journal, which included "A Small House with 'Lots of Room in It'" and "A Fireproof House of $5000." In the 1910s he developed an innovative semi-prefabrication scheme called the "American Ready-Cut System," in which lumber pre-cut in the factory could be assembled at the site in a variety of designs.

In 1916 a number of wood and plaster houses and duplex apartments were built in Milwaukee by Arthur L. Richards employing this system. Wright's intention was "an organization systematized in such a way that the result is guaranteed," cutting out "the tremendous waste that has in the past made house building on a beautiful scale possible only to the very rich."

His textile block houses in California of the 1920s, a project for sheet metal houses in California (1937), and his revival of the use of textile blocks in 1951 also demonstrate his involvement in different construction systems and affirm his interest in prefabrication.

In 1932 Wright spoke before the National Association of Real Estate Boards, discussing the concept of "the assembled house," and remarked that "there is no reason why the assembled house, fabricated in the factory, should not be made as beautiful and as efficient as the modern automobile."

In 1936-37 many of Wright's ideas about moderate-cost housing came to fruition with his first completed "Usonian" house, for Herbert Jacobs in Madison, Wisconsin. In the Usonian house, Wright's "dwelling place that has no feeling at all for the 'grand' except as the house extends itself in the flat parallel to the ground," Wright re-worked many architectural themes he had previously employed some thirty years before in his Prairie houses.

Usonian houses typically exhibited a number of planning and construction characteristics. Instead of decoration Wright relied on the beauty of natural materials. Many of the components of traditional building were eliminated, and standard materials and details were adapted to a geometric module. "Sandwich walls," consisting of a plywood center lined with building paper and faced with interior and exterior siding, held together with screws, and a simple slab roof carried on laminated 2x4 supports provided most of the basic enclosure of the Usonian house.

It had a functional spatial flew arranged around a masonry "core" with the kitchen











The Crimson Beech




The Crimson Beech





Lighthouse Hill, Staten Island

August 14, 1990, Designation List 226 LP-1773

"The Crimson Beech" (Cass House) on Staten Island is the only residence, and one of only two complete buildings, in New York City designed by American master architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An example of the "Prefab No. 1" prefabricated house designed by Wright in 1956 for builder Marshall Erdman & Associates of Madison, Wisconsin, "The Crimson Beech" was built in 1958-59 under the supervision of Wright's associate Morton H. Del son.

The Erdman prefabs were Wright's last major attempt in his long career to address the problem of well-designed moderate-cost houses, and despite the lesser cost he achieved a design quality consistent with his previous residential work. The components of the house were shipped by truck from Madison and assembled on a steep site on Lighthouse Hill overlooking Richmondtown.

A low, L-shaped, horizontally-articulated residence employing an architectural vocabulary characteristic of Wright's Usonian houses, it is faced in cream-colored painted Masonite with redwood battens and smooth-faced red brick, and has a carport, a reddish-painted terne metal gabled roof, and clerestory windows on the front and large expanses of glass on the rear.

The residence was commissioned by William and Catherine Cass after seeing Wright in a television interview, and the house has been very well maintained by the original client. "The Crimson Beech" took its name from a large several-hundred-year-old copper beech tree formerly growing in the front yard.

Frank Lloyd Wright and Moderate-cost Houses

Although American master architect Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) is perhaps best known for his residential commissions for the well-to-do and for his wide range of monumental designs, he also had an interest throughout his extraordinarily long career in the problem of producing well-designed moderate-cost housing. As stated by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives, Wright strongly believed that the average American was entitled to a home that could also be a work of art..~

He knew that if the maxim was to apply to the 1 ewer-income home, it would require either prefabrication or a systems-built method of construction. It meant, he explained, that the home would have to go to the factory, rather than skilled labor coming onto the building site.

As early as 1901, Wright produced a series of designs for moderate-cost model suburban houses for the Ladies Home Journal, which included "A Small House with 'Lots of Room in It'" and "A Fireproof House of $5000." In the 1910s he developed an innovative semi-prefabrication scheme called the "American Ready-Cut System," in which lumber pre-cut in the factory could be assembled at the site in a variety of designs.

In 1916 a number of wood and plaster houses and duplex apartments were built in Milwaukee by Arthur L. Richards employing this system. Wright's intention was "an organization systematized in such a way that the result is guaranteed," cutting out "the tremendous waste that has in the past made house building on a beautiful scale possible only to the very rich."

His textile block houses in California of the 1920s, a project for sheet metal houses in California (1937), and his revival of the use of textile blocks in 1951 also demonstrate his involvement in different construction systems and affirm his interest in prefabrication.

In 1932 Wright spoke before the National Association of Real Estate Boards, discussing the concept of "the assembled house," and remarked that "there is no reason why the assembled house, fabricated in the factory, should not be made as beautiful and as efficient as the modern automobile."

In 1936-37 many of Wright's ideas about moderate-cost housing came to fruition with his first completed "Usonian" house, for Herbert Jacobs in Madison, Wisconsin. In the Usonian house, Wright's "dwelling place that has no feeling at all for the 'grand' except as the house extends itself in the flat parallel to the ground," Wright re-worked many architectural themes he had previously employed some thirty years before in his Prairie houses.

Usonian houses typically exhibited a number of planning and construction characteristics. Instead of decoration Wright relied on the beauty of natural materials. Many of the components of traditional building were eliminated, and standard materials and details were adapted to a geometric module. "Sandwich walls," consisting of a plywood center lined with building paper and faced with interior and exterior siding, held together with screws, and a simple slab roof carried on laminated 2x4 supports provided most of the basic enclosure of the Usonian house.

It had a functional spatial flew arranged around a masonry "core" with the kitchen, bathroom,









lighthouse yard decorations







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